ma0331688

từ Anumanandal, Tamil Nadu, Ấn Độ từ Anumanandal, Tamil Nadu, Ấn Độ

Người đọc từ Anumanandal, Tamil Nadu, Ấn Độ

từ Anumanandal, Tamil Nadu, Ấn Độ

ma0331688

This book feels like a pre-cursor to "A Million Little Pieces" in that the writing style feels hasty, stream-of-conscious at times, and the story is catastrophic, it's difficult to believe. But I preferred this to AMLP. And it was written in 2004 (compared to James Frey's 2003 work) so nevermind that. At times the writing style feels incoherent and unedited -- the parts that were written as theatric scripts were particularly annoying to read. The author writes with total detachment which I found frustrating given his position as the central character supposedly, but I guess that's how he felt his story needed to be told and maybe that's how he was able to cope with such a tortuous upbringing. Here's a quote I liked, describing one of the homeless men at the shelter he works at that he befriends: "He passes through the doors like another man's shadow, his face pressed to the wall, almost part of the wall, like he's using it to pull himself along. Mumbling and squirrelly, small with large hands, a hooked nose, his graying hair slicked back, Joe Morgan never sleeps in a bed, never lines up with the rest, almost no one has spoken to him in all these years. We walk to a diner in Southie, where he nearly gets us killed by muttering about the 'hippies' in the adjacent booth, whom I would describe as 'bikers.'" This book taught me that Emack & Bolio's (Boston ice cream parlor) was named after two homeless men. The cover flap says this story is about "one boy's struggle for survival", but that's not accurate.